Maasai girls as young as 12 years-old are often married off by their fathers for the dowries they bring.
For centuries the Maasai, famous as herders and warriors, lived a nomadic life throughout East Africa. They were a fiercely independent people who firmly adhered to their traditions.

Today life is different. The nomadic way of life is becoming a thing of the past and formal education is becoming more acceptable, at least for boys. 

But the girls of the Maasai still face many obstacles to going to school. 

Poverty
A Maasai family’s “wealth” is almost entirely made up of livestock. As a result, any money they have for education is used primarily for the family’s boys.

Dowry
A daughter’s marriage increases the “wealth” of her family through the receipt of livestock dowries. The opportunity to increase this “wealth” leads fathers to marry off their daughters as soon as they reach puberty, often to older men who already have other wives. 

Children
There is family and peer pressure for early marriage as women are valued for the number of children they bear. 

Beliefs
There is a cultural belief that the biological family doesn’t benefit from educating a daughter as she becomes a member of her husband’s family when she marries.

With the support of our sponsors, and the encouragement of the girls’ mothers, the girls of the Maasai are overcoming these obstacles and realizing their dreams of going to school!

We need your help to send more of these girls to school! 

Find out about Sponsorship!

Watch a video about Maasai girls and our partner Emusoi Center



EfforTZ Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charity. 
EfforTZ Foundation, 447 Davisville Road, East Falmouth, MA 02536  -  effortz4kidz@aol.com  -  508-548-3703
Website Design by Sheryl Seyfert              



EfforTZ Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charity. 
EfforTZ Foundation, 447 Davisville Road, East Falmouth, MA 02536  -  effortz4kidz@aol.com  -  508-548-3703
Website Design by Sheryl Seyfert